March 4, 2009

Just hanging around.

Beerhenge.Clonehenge is a blog with a mission:

Encouraged by an internet acquaintance of like mind, we began to search online for Stonehenge references and replicas. It was casual at first–just for laughs–a butter henge here, some biscuit henges there, and of course the well known ones like car henge and fridge henge and the modern stone “henges” scattered about the States. But after a bit the sheer number of ersatz henges [we use the word henge here, not in the true sense of a circular earthwork mound with a ditch, but in the sense that it is commonly if mistakenly understood, as a stone circle, often with lintels over some pairs of stones] filled us with a kind of horror-filled joy, and we decided something must be done.

Clonehenge is that something. It is a celebration of those first builders who erected Stonehenge as we understand it today, whose idea has turned out to be the ancestor of all icons, so powerful in image that five thousand years later people feel compelled to emulate their achievement, often in the most unlikely places and unsuitable media.

It is also a celebration of the ingenuity and mad genius of those people today who decide, usually for no reason except fun and the challenge, to make Stonehenges out of anything they can lay their hands on. Hurray for the builders!

They have already found most, though not all, of the usual suspects. The photograph is of one of my own creations, Beerhenge, made from two cans of Yebisu and a hip flask. As an added bonus that is, indeed, the summer solstice sunrise.

2 comments

Hi, thank you for the link! We know we don't have them all. We do have a list of future posts (and a bunch we'd post but are still seeking elusive permissions for!), but we're always looking for more Stonehenge replicas. If you know of some we don't have, please tell us what they are. If we find and get permission for a photo so we can post the one you suggest, we'll credit you for the reference.

Nice photo! *grin*

user-pic

Thanks, this reminded me of an astonishing installation I saw in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan some years ago at Da Yoopers Tourist Trap, possibly the largest folk-sculpture collection I have seen. So I emailed them some links. Just hangin around.

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This page contains a single entry by Feòrag published on March 4, 2009 12:19 AM.

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