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January 18, 2004

Report Examines Kiddie Fiddling Priests

by Red Wolf

United States: The Miami Archdiocese has revealed that thirty-eight priests have been accused of sexually abusing children during the archdiocese's 45-year history. It is just one archdiocese of many airing its dirty laundry and forwarding reports to the John Jay School of Criminal Justice for inclusion in a report commissioned by the US Conference of Catholic Bishops.

The report does not list a breakdown of when the allegations involving minors and clergy were reported, but at least 17 priests from the Miami Archdiocese have been accused of sexual misconduct since the clergy abuse scandal became a national crisis for the church in January 2002, when the Boston Archdiocese released court documents showing a former priest was retained despite evidence he had molested children.
The Boston Archdiocese has mortgaged its cathedral and seminary to finance settlements to 542 clergy sex abuse victims, totaling nearly $90 million.

The Archbishop also noted that very few of the priests were child molesters, claiming that 4,302 priests, or 99.1% had never been accused of diddling the young. To be fair, that's probably a better ratio than many other organisations...

...but most other organisations don't protect their misbehaving leaders at the expense of their victims.

Archdiocese releases abuse report - The Miami Herald, 14th December 2003 (via morons.org).

Posted in Hypocrisy at 00:23. Last modified on September 28 2006 at 23:42.
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