Reading Matter: July 2005 Archives

July 31, 2005

Pocket Guide to the Apocalypse, Jason Boyett

Relevant Books, 2005.

Wondering what all the fuss about Left Behind comes from? Bewildered as to why different fundies either recommend the books wholeheartedly, or condemn them vehemently, usually for different reasons than the next evangelist along? Well, perhaps this small tome can help clear things up a little.

Starting with a short Apocalyptionary, defining all those niggling little terms like eschatology, dispensationalism and Leonard Bernstein, the next two chapters detail end-of-the-world prophecy from 4000 years ago to now. This section doesn't cover Christianity alone, with examples from Zoroastrianism, Islam and a Hindu contribution concerning a goat which isn't really the end of the world, but was too amusing to leave out.

Then there's the question of who the Antichrist might be. Boyett looks at the main candidates and assesses their likelihood on a 10-point scale of his own devising. Alas, Prattle favourites George W. Bush, Prince William and Arnold Schwarzenegger are strangely absent.

After a more detailed examination of the different types of belief regarding the end times, the long words associated with them, and how believers explain away the inevitable contradictions associated with each one. we finish with a miscelleneous collection of stuff including ways in which the world might really end, whether by natural causes or through human folly.

Boyett makes some obscure bits of theology thoroughly accessible, in a style which is lively and irreverant. And the book's cheap too! Recommended.

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This page is an archive of entries in the Reading Matter category from July 2005.

Reading Matter: April 2005 is the previous archive.

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